And some brief cooking notes

Nothing too major this week but I did try a couple of things — back over the weekend, a little sauteed chard with raisins, garlic and goat cheese:

Chard w/raisins, garlic and goat cheese

And a few days after that, a cold cabbage/cucumber soup:

Cabbage/cucumber soup

Which given how this week turned out colder than normal might not have been the right approach, but hey! There are a slew of cold cabbage soup recipes out there if you’d like to try further — I used this one, minus the buttermilk.

Fried cabbage on brown rice

Another recipe that came with the latest basket — enjoyable, might have needed more curry powder or seasoning to give it some extra punch but plenty filling!

1 sm Onion, finely chopped
6 tb Oil
1 lg Tomato, sliced
1/2 ts Salt
1/2 ts Curry powder
1 md Cabbage, shredded
2 ea Carrots, sliced into rounds
1 ea Green bell pepper, chopped

Over moderate heat, fry the onion in oil until lightly browned, stirring to prevent scorching. Add tomatoes, salt & curry powder & continue to stir-fry for 3 minutes.
Add cabbage, carrots & pepper & mix well. Pour in about 1/2 c water. Cover the pot, reduce heat & simmer until the liquid is abosrbed & the cabbage is still slightly crunchy.

“Hiyashi chuuka: Japanese Chinese-style cold noodles”


So went the description from the webpage I took the basic recipe from, the extremely wonderful justhungry.com, which I’ve used before for various Japanese-inspired dishes in particular.

It was a VERY hot and wonderful day down here — spring has sprung! — and I wanted to have a cooler dish for dinner after some spring cleaning. Being near Mitsuwa, as always, helped, so besides the main entree itself and the accompanying mustard, I snagged a bean cake and some good sake because, hey, why not? Made for a lovely meal, in fact the first this year on the balcony table.

The idea of the dish is that noodles have to be prepared in the proper fashion — again, refer to the excellent page I’ve linked for details — but that anything can top it so long as it’s good cold. This is not as colorful as it could have been — should have snagged some ginger — but the combination of baked tofu, kohlrabi and cabbage still worked very well. Highly recommended if you want to give it a try.

Lahanorizo (or a variant of same)


Figuring out what to do with cabbage is always a bit of a chore for me — nothing wrong with cabbage, I just want to try and do something a little different with it each time. A random google scrounge turned up this Greek recipe — enjoyed it very much, though I’m willing to bet this is far from a traditional version as such. (I’m not sure if they use red cabbage, to start with, while I was lacking tomatoes and had to use some tomato paste instead.) That said, this was quite tasty, and I’ve got some left over for tomorrow to eat with a salad and some bread.

The recipe as quoted on the page follows below:

Ingredients:

1 Medium Cabbage
2-3 Tablespoon Olive Oil
1 Medium Onion Finely Chopped
2-3 Pinch Parsley To Taste
1-2 Pinch Pepper To Taste
3/4 Cup Rice
2-3 Pinch Salt To Taste
2 Large Tomatoes Finely Chopped
1 1/4 Cup Water

Directions:

* Chop the cabbage finely.
* On low heat, fry the onion just until transparent.
* Add the cabbage and cook until wilted.
* Add the tomatoes and water.
* When it starts to boil, add the rice, parsley, salt and pepper.
* Simmer until very little liquid remains, approx. 20 minutes.
* May serve with sliced lemon.